The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado presents,  Deconstructing P’aqo: On the Origins of Andean Shamanism

The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado presents Deconstructing P’aqo: On the Origins of Andean Shamanism

a lecture by Deborah Bryon

May 11th, 2018 at 7:15 p.m.

Archeological evidence confirms that shamanism appeared roughly 20,000 years ago in Siberia. Preeminently a phenomenon of the Central Asian Steppe, the word shaman is not Peruvian in origin, but comes from the Tungus language and refers to the “priest of the Ural-Altaic people.” From the Tungus word ‘saman,’ it literally means “one who is excited, moved, or raised.” The role of shaman can be found throughout ancient indigenous cultures including among the extant healers practicing in the Peruvian Andes. Like the shaman, the p’aqo is a specialist in ecstatic trance, a technician of the sacred. In altered states of consciousness, he or she communes with powers animating the world in order to address specific problems of the community.  Dr Bryon will focus on the origins of this unique calling, its provenance within the Central Asian Steppe, and its direct impact on the practices and traditions of the Peruvian p’aqo

(a workshop on May 12 will be open to the public. More information is to come.) 

Deborah Bryon, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist and senior Jungian Analyst in Denver, CO. She is also an artist member of Spark Gallery. Deborah has written books on the Inca Shamans, receives ongoing in-depth training with Q’ero shamans in Peru and has undergone a series of sacred initiations with them.

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The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado Presents, Poetics of the I Ching: Metaphor and the Book of Changes

The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado Presents

Poetics of the I Ching: Metaphor and the Book of Changes

a lecture by Gary Foster and Autumn Noelle Hall

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April 6th, 2018 at 7:15 p.m.
Cost: free to members,  $15 at the door,
$10 students and seniors

The ancient Chinese Oracle is at once a tool to trace the patterns of change in one’s own life and a guide for one’s personal psychic understanding. Learn how consulting the I Ching creates a confluence between the Inner and Outer sage, symbolically yielding poetry and meaning. Understand how to build one of 64 hexagrams and interpret the changes of the lines within, find the underlying pattern of change in the moment, and trace the creative movement of Yin and Yang in your life.

Gary Foster, MA-COMM, is a graduate of the Defense Language Instituted (DLI) in Monterey, California where he studied Chinese Mandarin. He later received his undergraduate degree in Asian Studies/Chinese and a Master’s degree in Communications. Gary worked for 33 years as a Chinese Linguist/Cryptanalyst and Intelligence Analyst/Consultant for the Department of Defense. He has travelled widely in Asia and brings over 40 years of I Ching practice and study to bear on his understanding of Asian culture and thought.

Autumn Noelle Hall is an honor graduate of DLI and served for 4 years as a Chinese linguist for the DOD. She is an internationally recognized Asian Short Form poet and is currently the Tanka Prose editor for Ribbons, the official print journal of the Tanka Society of  America. She and Gary have partnered for the last 10 years in furthering their mutual understanding of the I Ching.

For further information, please contact The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado at

(303) 575-1055

The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado presents, The Lumen Naturae: Let There Be Light!

The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado presents

The Lumen Naturae: Let There Be Light!

a lecture by John Todd

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March 2nd, 2018 at 7:15 p.m.
Cost: free to members,  $15 at the door,
$10 students and seniors

Jung often saw parallels between our relationship to the unconscious and our relationship to Nature. According to Jung, “Nature is not matter only, she is spirit. Were that not so, the only source of spirit would be human reason. It is the great achievement of Paracelsus to have elevated the “light of nature” to a principle…The lumen naturae is the natural spirit, whose strange and significant workings we can observe in the manifestations of the unconscious….” This lecture will be an exploration of the concept of the Lumen Naturae and its importance in Jungian theory as well as the “light bringers” who deliver its message, via clinical and mythological/fairy tale material.

John Todd, Ph.D. is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in Evergreen, Colorado. He graduated from the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and is the Associate Director of Training for the C.G. Jung Institute of Colorado.

For further information, please contact The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado at

(303) 575-1055

The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado presents: Matter and Spirit: A Look at Psychology & Alchemy in the Process of Individuation

The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado presents

Matter and Spirit: A Look at Psychology & Alchemy in the Process of Individuation

a lecture by Lara Newton

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February 2nd, 2018 at 7:15 p.m.
Park Hill United Church of Christ,
2600 Leyden Street 
Cost: free to members,  $15 at the door,
$10 students and seniors

C.G. Jung saw his psychological work as similar to that of the solitary alchemist, striving both to liberate spirit from matter and to imbue the inert matter with spirit, a cyclical process in which the transformative experience of individuation comes to life. In this lecture, Lara Newton will present and explore the psychological dimensions that alchemical imagery opens to us. She will discuss the alchemical process and some of the major operations from a depth psychological perspective, always recognizing that the container for this process is our human experience of the ever-evolving movement between matter and spirit. Throughout the presentation, dreams will be used to amplify and elucidate the alchemical images and process.

Lara Newton, M.A., is a Senior Diplomate Jungian Analyst in private practice in Denver, Colorado. She is the Director of Training for the C.G. Jung Institute of Colorado and the President of the C.G. Jung Society of Colorado.  

For further information, please contact The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado at

(303) 575-1055

The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado Spring 2018 Lecture Series

The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado
Spring 2018 Lecture Series
UPDATED MAY LECTURE AND PRESENTER

Please note our location and format: Park Hill United Church of Christ, 2600 Leyden Street, Denver, CO 80207; Social and refreshment time will be 6:30-7:15p.m., followed by lecture and discussion.

Cost: free to members,  $15 at the door,  $10 students and seniors

[DOWNLOAD PRINTABLE PDF]

Matter and Spirit: A Look at Psychology & Alchemy in the Process of Individuation

a lecture by Lara Newton 
February 2nd, 2018 at 7:15 p.m.

C.G. Jung saw his psychological work as similar to that of the solitary alchemist, striving both to liberate spirit from matter and to imbue the inert matter with spirit, a cyclical process in which the transformative experience of individuation comes to life. In this lecture, Lara Newton will present and explore the psychological dimensions that alchemical imagery opens to us. She will discuss the alchemical process and some of the major operations from a depth psychological perspective, always recognizing that the container for this process is our human experience of the ever-evolving movement between matter and spirit. Throughout the presentation, dreams will be used to amplify and elucidate the alchemical images and process.

Lara Newton, M.A., is a Senior Diplomate Jungian Analyst in private practice in Denver, Colorado. She is the Director of Training for the C.G. Jung Institute of Colorado and the President of the C.G. Jung Society of Colorado.  

The Lumen Naturae: Let There Be Light!

a lecture by John Todd
March 2nd, 2018 at 7:15 p.m.

Jung often saw parallels between our relationship to the unconscious and our relationship to Nature. According to Jung, “Nature is not matter only, she is spirit. Were that not so, the only source of spirit would be human reason. It is the great achievement of Paracelsus to have elevated the “light of nature” to a principle…The lumen naturae is the natural spirit, whose strange and significant workings we can observe in the manifestations of the unconscious….” This lecture will be an exploration of the concept of the Lumen Naturae and its importance in Jungian theory as well as the “light bringers” who deliver its message, via clinical and mythological/fairy tale material.

John Todd, Ph.D. is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in Evergreen, Colorado. He graduated from the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and is the Associate Director of Training for the C.G. Jung Institute of Colorado.

Poetics of the I Ching: Metaphor and the Book of Changes

a lecture by Gary Foster and Autumn Noelle Hall
April 6th, 2018

The ancient Chinese Oracle is at once a tool to trace the patterns of change in one’s own life and a guide for one’s personal psychic understanding. Learn how consulting the I Ching creates a confluence between the Inner and Outer sage, symbolically yielding poetry and meaning. Understand how to build one of 64 hexagrams and interpret the changes of the lines within, find the underlying pattern of change in the moment, and trace the creative movement of Yin and Yang in your life.

Gary Foster, MA-COMM, is a graduate of the Defense Language Instituted (DLI) in Monterey, California where he studied Chinese Mandarin. He later received his undergraduate degree in Asian Studies/Chinese and a Master’s degree in Communications. Gary worked for 33 years as a Chinese Linguist/Cryptanalyst and Intelligence Analyst/Consultant for the Department of Defense. He has travelled widely in Asia and brings over 40 years of I Ching practice and study to bear on his understanding of Asian culture and thought.

Autumn Noelle Hall is an honor graduate of DLI and served for 4 years as a Chinese linguist for the DOD. She is an internationally recognized Asian Short Form poet and is currently the Tanka Prose editor for Ribbons, the official print journal of the Tanka Society of  America. She and Gary have partnered for the last 10 years in furthering their mutual understanding of the I Ching.

Deconstructing P’aqo: On the Origins of Andean Shamanism

a lecture by Deborah Bryon

 May 11th, 2018 at 7:15 p.m.

Archeological evidence confirms that shamanism appeared roughly 20,000 years ago in Siberia. Preeminently a phenomenon of the Central Asian Steppe, the word shaman is not Peruvian in origin, but comes from the Tungus language and refers to the “priest of the Ural-Altaic people.” From the Tungus word ‘saman,’ it literally means “one who is excited, moved, or raised.” The role of shaman can be found throughout ancient indigenous cultures including among the extant healers practicing in the Peruvian Andes. Like the shaman, the p’aqo is a specialist in ecstatic trance, a technician of the sacred. In altered states of consciousness, he or she communes with powers animating the world in order to address specific problems of the community.  Dr Bryon will focus on the origins of this unique calling, its provenance within the Central Asian Steppe, and its direct impact on the practices and traditions of the Peruvian p’aqo

(a workshop on May 12 will be open to the public. More information is to come.) 

Deborah Bryon, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist and senior Jungian Analyst in Denver, CO. She is also an artist member of Spark Gallery. Deborah has written books on the Inca Shamans, receives ongoing in-depth training with Q’ero shamans in Peru and has undergone a series of sacred initiations with them.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: NOVEMBER 3 LECTURE CANCELLATION

Dear Jungian community,
We are sorry to announce that the lecture for this coming Friday evening (November 3) — “In Search of Philosopher’s Stones” — is cancelled. Our presenter Dr. Steve Parker, who lives in Alaska, has become seriously ill and cannot travel at this time. Please spread the word to anyone you know who might be planning to attend, and join us in hoping for Steve’s recovery.
Regards,
Lara

THE C.G. JUNG SOCIETY OF COLORADO FALL 2017 LECTURE SERIES

The C.G. Jung Society of Colorado
FALL 2017 Lecture Series

Cost: free to members,  $15 at the door,  $10 students and seniors

[DOWNLOAD PRINTABLE PDF]

C.G. Jung in Africa: A Journey to the Innermost Self
 a lecture by Andreas Schweizer
September 8th, 2017 at 7:15 p.m.

Despite a not really encouraging I Ching C.G. Jung embarked a steamer heading for Mombasa in October 1925. His companions were George Beckwith and Peter Baynes. Later Ruth Bailey joined the threesome.

For Jung this journey was a major breakthrough in his life. Barbara Hannah, in her Jung biography, called his encounter with the Masai warrior “who had been waiting for [Jung] for five thousand years,” and with the gigantic herds of animals on the Athi Plains, grazing just as they have done “through hundreds of millions of years”, Jung’s two enlightenments in Africa.

Returning from his expedition, Jung suffered a huge cultural shock. He now realized what the white man has done to this world. In a seminar he sadly stated, “Wherever the white man went, there was hell for the other nations; one has to be outside to understand. The white man is a very beast devouring the earth, the whole world trembles at him.”

On Jung Africa left a never waning yearning for the return to the archaic world, the return to our soul.

Andreas Schweizer, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst in Zürich. He studied theology and comparative religion as well as Egyptology with Prof. Erik Hornung in Basel. He has been a training analyst since 1986, first at the C.G. Jung Institute in Küsnacht and currently with ISAP-Zürich. He is president of the Psychology Club, founded in 1916 by C.G. Jung, and was for fourteen years president of the Eranos Conference in Ascona. He has published numerous essays and books, including The Sungod’s Journey through the Netherworld (Cornell University Press, 2010). His main current interest is in The Red Book.


Symptom and Symbol:  The Search for Meaning and Expansion of Consciousness in the Experience of Illness
a lecture by Nicholas Nossaman
October 6th, 2017 at 7:15 p.m.

The experience of being sick can vary from temporary indisposition to devastating chronic illness. The accompanying symptoms can be transitory and mild or unrelenting, long lasting, and tormenting.  Accordingly, meaninglessness and lack of control, with a resulting feeling of powerlessness, often accompanies the illness experience.  In this presentation we’ll try to look behind the curtain into the world of archetypes, and search beyond symptoms, to their potential symbolic meaning. Any success in this venture will help us gain consciousness and a measure of relief, as well as contributing to the individuation process.

Nicholas Nossaman, M.D., D.Ht. is a physician, closing in on his 50th year of general practice, specializing in homeopathic medicine. He has been immersed, as well, in Jungian studies since the early 70’s and has been fascinated by the kinship of depth psychology and homeopathy. He has written and presented about that kinship as well as the Jungian perspective on suffering and the symbolism of the labyrinth.


Intersecting Stories: A Jungian Musing on Mixed Race, Ethnicity and Religion
a lecture by Chris Chao
December 1st, 2017 at 7:15 p.m.

In Memories, Dreams, Reflections, Jung says: “Individuation means becoming a singular, homogeneous being, and, insofar as “individuality” embraces our innermost, last and

incomparable uniqueness, it also implies becoming one’s own self.”

As the demographic grows of people who are born into families that are made up of a mix of ethnicities, races and religions, what sorts of issues do they bring into our offices? What sorts of dreams do they have? How do they find their myth?

This talk will explore the cultural wounds, conflicts, strengths and resources that are found in the psyches of people from mixed backgrounds as they work to become a unique self.

Christine Chao, Ph.D.is a licensed clinical psychologist and Jungian Analyst in private practice in Denver. She is Director of Admissions for the C.G. Jung Institute of Colorado. She is past clinical director and interim executive director of the Asian Pacific Center for Human Development, where she continues to consult and provide clinical supervision. Her interests include identity formation, ancestral altars in cultures around the world, and how Jungian work can help open “seats at the welcome table” for people from widely diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds.