THE C.G. JUNG SOCIETY OF COLORADO SPRING 2016 LECTURE SERIES

Please note our location and format: Park Hill United Church of Christ, 2600 Leyden Street, Denver, CO 80207; Social and refreshment time will be 6:30-7:15p.m., followed by lecture and discussion.

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The Archetypal nature of History
a lecture by Jeffrey Raff
February 12th, 2016 at 7:15 p.m.
Park Hill United Church of Christ,
2600 Leyden Street
Cost: free to members, $15 at the door,
$10 students and seniors

Some historians today have discovered that unconscious influences have a major impact on history. These influences represent evolutionary imperatives that can influence individual and collective choices, making people act for reasons they may not be aware of. These cultural imperatives may easily be compared to archetypes of the collective unconscious which Jungians have long suspected influence history in many ways. In this lecture I shall examine some of these archetypes and examine the way they create repeated patterns of behavior which can be noted in different historical periods. In addition, I shall use my own dreams and experiences to probe a deeper level of historical understanding, one that includes an alchemical perspective and a non-traditional and non-rational way of understanding the meaning of history.

Jeffrey Raff, Ph.D. is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich and has been in private practice in Denver for forty years. He is currently the president of the C.G. Jung Institute of Colorado and is the author of four books, including Jung and the Alchemical Imagination and The Wedding of Sophia.


Discoveries in the Dark: Entering the Cave of the Unconscious
a lecture by Claudia Schmitt
March 4th, 2016 at 7:15 p.m.
Park Hill United Church of Christ,
2600 Leyden Street
Cost: free to members, $15 at the door,
$10 students and seniors

The cave as an archetypal symbol leads one into the womb of the Great Mother and the realm of the unconscious. It is a symbol of paradox and numinosity. This is a place where gods have been born and prophets enlightened. In its space is emptiness and containment, a place of absolute darkness yet revelatory light. It has been a place of safety and hiding, but also of disorientation and death. In Greek it is koilos and means “hollow.” In this hollow are pure potential, possibility and oblivion. In utter and complete darkness the cave waits. Sometimes the hollow becomes a grave, a final resting place and a return to the great potential from whence all existence emerges. At other times this hollow brings forth creativity and new life. Ultimately in this space of potential, birth, death or rebirth, we encounter life’s psycho-dynamic tensions. In this lecture we will explore the many facets of the enigmatic cave experience.

Claudia C. Schmitt, M.Div. is the senior minister at Wheat Ridge Congregational Church of the United Church of Christ and a Training Candidate at the C.G. Jung Institute of Colorado. Claudia received her Master of Divinity Degree from the Iliff School of Theology and is a registered psychotherapist with the State of Colorado. 


Shame and Wild Geese
a lecture by Lois Vanderkooi
April 1st, 2016 at 7:15 p.m.
Park Hill United Church of Christ,
2600 Leyden Street
Cost: free to members, $15 at the door,
$10 students and seniors

The Dalai Lama has conversed with Western neuroscientists and meditation teachers over the years. It is reported that he was puzzled that many Westerners suffer from low self-esteem (in his words, a lack of compassion for oneself or self-directed contempt). In my view, this complex of unworthiness relates to archetypal shame and is found throughout time and probably all cultures. As the story goes, the Buddha faced it and claimed his worth before becoming enlightened. In modern times, it is the grist of much psychotherapy work as people seek wholeness and healing. In this talk, I will use Mary Oliver’s poem, “Wild Geese” and stories from Genesis to explore how this strong complex arises and can be addressed. My goal will be to sow some seeds of release from the subtle and maybe not so subtle trance of the inner critic through the poem and guided exercises.

Lois Vanderkooi, Ph.D. is a psychologist in Broomfield. In 1980, she read Jung’s autobiography, which resonated so deeply that she forsook a lawyer-sociologist career to pursue Jungian analysis and studies. She went on to receive a doctorate in psychology and also trained in Somatic Experiencing trauma work, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, and Biodynamic Cranial-Sacral Therapy. She is particularly interested in the integration of body, mind, and spirit in oneself and relationships through cultivation of mindfulness and non-violence. 


The Bad Mother
a lecture by Puddi Kullberg
May 13th, 2016 at 7:15 p.m.
Park Hill United Church of Christ,
2600 Leyden Street
Cost: free to members, $15 at the door,
$10 students and seniors

In fairy tales it’s the wicked/mean/evil step-mother who often takes the rap. Perhaps it would be too traumatizing to tell the tale, “Once upon a time, the children’s mother convinced their father to take them out to the woods and abandon them.” Can we even approach “The Bad Mother”? In this presentation we’ll try to look at her in a more nuanced light than childhood terror can apprehend. We’ll see her from different angles, illustrated from Jung’s writings, literature and movies. We’ll consider her fate and (im)possible (?) redemption.

Puddi Kullberg, M.A., L.P.C. is a Jungian Analyst and has been a psychotherapist based in Colorado Springs for twenty years. She trained to become an analyst through the former Denver Jung Seminar of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts, from which she graduated in 2012. She is now a member of the C. G. Jung Institute of Colorado where she teaches and participates in training. Puddi has been interested in “The Bad Mother” for many years because it was constellated decades ago in her own life and so she has had to struggle to come to terms with it. Of course, she has then had the experience of having clients for whom this is also an issue and so Puddi has seen “The Bad Mother” as though through a prism, as a many faceted phenomenon.

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