Lecture Archives: Fall 2014

CG JUNG SOCIETY

Fall 2014 Lecture Series

Please note our new format:
Social/refreshment time will be from 6:30-7:15 p.m., followed by lecture and discussion.

Jung Society of Colorado – Fall 2014 (downloadable PDF)

“Lullay, Lullay, Litel Child”: Evocation of Wholeness through Symbols in the Art of Christmas
a lecture by Jane Kopp
December 12th, 2014 at 7:15 p.m.
Althea Center for Engaged Spirituality,
14th Ave. and Williams St.
Cost: free to members, $15 at the door,
$10 students and seniors

C.G. Jung grappled in various ways with the difficulty of reconciling Christian dogma with truths of the psyche as he understood them, and so have notable
Jungians since. The art, poetry, and music of Christmas, however, especially that of the Middle Ages, found almost magical ways to evade most of the difficulties involved. Artistic imagination and folk wisdom contrived remarkable strategies to combine the ideal with the worldly, adding in the mysterious element of beauty. Even today, medieval depictions of events surrounding the Nativity not only provoke laughter that is healing rather than mean, moving us almost to tears; they also have a power to balance and re-vitalize both non-believers and believers—sometimes with more effectiveness than either camp can comfortably account for. This lecture will illustrate with examples from painting and sculpture, from the poetry of less well known medieval lyrics and carols, and from the medieval music of Christmas as well.

Jane Kopp, Ph.D., studied classical Greek and Latin languages and literature at Brown University. She holds an M.A. from Cambridge (UK) in medieval languages, literature, and art, and an M.A. as well as a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in the same areas. A former dean of the graduate school at the University of New Mexico, she is now an adjunct faculty member at DU and director of Brooks Center for Spirituality.


Practice of Indigenous Incan Traditions
with Master Shamans Altomesayoq Adolfo Ttito Condori and Hmaut’a Rodolfo Ttito Condor
November 21st, 2014 at 7:15 p.m.
Althea Center for Engaged Spirituality,
14th Ave. and Williams St.
Cost: free to members, $15 at the door,
$10 students and seniors

As many of us are becoming increasingly aware, we are in a time of deep change – and now more than ever – are in need of remembering the old ways of connecting to the natural living world around us. Adolfo Ttito Condori, a descendent of the ancient lineage of the Canchi people of the Andes Mountains, is one of only eight altomesayoqs (high shamans) still living in Peru today. He and his brother Rodolfo Ttito Condopri, have agreed to come to the United States to teach, to bring the tradition of true indigenous Inca medicine and ritual technology to the West. This lecture and workshop will be a rare opportunity to learn the ancient practice of Incan medicine and cosmology from one of the few authentic Andean masters, here in
our community.
(a workshop on Nov. 22 will be sponsored by the C.G. Jung Institute and
open to the public) Altomesayoq (High Shaman) Adolfo Ttito Condori and Hmaut’a Rodolfo Ttito Condor are Master shamans from the
Andean Region of Peru.


Myth, Death and Grief: How Myth Brings Meaning to Loss
a lecture by Kay Todd
October 10th, 2014 at 7:15 p.m.
Althea Center for Engaged Spirituality,
14th Ave. and Williams St.
Cost: free to members, $15 at the door,
$10 students and seniors

Discover the profound resources myth can offer as we grieve the loss of a loved one and contemplate our own mortality. Death shatters the world we have known, presenting a profound challenge to our normal experiences of meaning. In this lecture we will explore how the wellspring of the unconscious can guide us through the necessary encounter with meaninglessness and suffering. How do the archetypal patterns expressed in myth influence the way we address grief, loss, and trauma? What rituals does our culture accept for expressing our feelings of loss – and what aspects of our experience does our culture repress or ignore? We will examine Greek myth and explore how changing our myths of grieving can make deep, necessary,personal and social changes.

Kay Todd, Ph.D., received her PhD in mythological studies with an emphasis in depth psychology from Pacifica Graduate Institute and is a graduate of the Grief, Loss and Trauma
certificate program, designed by Janet Schreiber and Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, at Southwestern University in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She has
taught as an adjunct professor in religion and interpersonal communication at the University of Oklahoma and Tulsa Community College and continues to lecture for the Jungian Society and conducts workshops around the country. She is the book author of “The Gift of Grief” and numerous articles.


Jung’s Dreams of the Self
a lecture by John Todd
September 5th, 2014 at 7:15 p.m.
Althea Center for Engaged Spirituality,
14th Ave. and Williams St.
Cost: free to members, $15 at the door,
$10 students and seniors

This lecture is an exploration of Jung’s dreams that appear to be about his relationship with the Self as well as the personal history surrounding those dreams. The intent of this exercise is to explore in what ways Jung’s dreams in the first and second halves of his life and
the experiences associated with these dreams point to his development of the Self concept. Each dream will be explored within its historical context. Jung’s interpretation of the dreams as well as some interpretations of his biographers and my own reflections will be considered in hopes of gaining further insight on his concept of the Self and Jung himself.

John Todd, Ph.D. is a Jungian Analyst and has been in private practice since 1993. He graduated from the IRSJA last year, is a member of the C.G. Jung Institute of Colorado and the IRSJA, and currently practices in Evergreen.

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